Truth and Consequences Revisited

By William McCallum

What are extraneous solutions?

A while ago I wrote a blog post about solving equations where I talked about seeing the steps in solving equations as logical deductions. Thus the steps
\begin{align*}3x + 2 &= 5\\3x &= 3\\x &= 1\\ \end{align*}

are best thought of as a sequence of if-then statements: If $x$ is a number such that $3x + 2 = 5$, then $3x = 3$; if $3x = 3$, then $x = 1$. Continue reading “Truth and Consequences Revisited”

Catalyzing Change through the IM Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 Math

NCTM has called for structural and curricular changes in high school mathematics. Learn about how IM’s high school curriculum is aligned with the vision put forth by NCTM to end tracking, implement effective targeted instructional supports, and broaden the focus of teaching high school mathematics beyond college and career readiness.

Continue reading “Catalyzing Change through the IM Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 Math”

Why is 3 – 5 = 3 + (-5)?

You will never have to subtract again.

Students sometimes learn about addition and subtraction of integers using integer chips. These are circular chips, with a yellow chip representing +1 and a red chip representing -1. You start with the all-important rule that $1 + (\text-1) = 0$, so you can add or remove a red-yellow pair without changing the number. To calculate the right hand side of the equation in the title, $3 + (\text-5)$, you put 3 yellow chips together with 5 red chips, then remove 3 red-yellow pairs, leaving 2 red chips. So $3 + (\text-5) = -2$.

Continue reading “Why is 3 – 5 = 3 + (-5)?”

Professional Learning Through a Fraction Task Progression

DOWNLOAD THE IM FEATURED FRACTION TASKS

Teaching mathematics is a continuous cycle of identifying where each student is in their learning trajectory and determining meaningful ways in which to build on their current understandings. While we often have little control over students’ mathematical experiences before they walk into our classrooms, we do have complete control of our own learning.

Continue reading “Professional Learning Through a Fraction Task Progression”

Up ↑